John Connor

Summary

Affiliation: Boston University School of Medicine
Location: Boston, usa
URL: www.connorlab.com

Publications

  1. pmc Vesicular stomatitis virus infection alters the eIF4F translation initiation complex and causes dephosphorylation of the eIF4E binding protein 4E-BP1
    John H Connor
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
    J Virol 76:10177-87. 2002
  2. pmc New mRNAs are preferentially translated during vesicular stomatitis virus infection
    Zackary W Whitlow
    Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
    J Virol 82:2286-94. 2008
  3. pmc Lassa and Marburg viruses elicit distinct host transcriptional responses early after infection
    Ignacio S Caballero
    Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Boston University, 24 Cummington st, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    BMC Genomics 15:960. 2014
  4. pmc In vitro inhibition of monkeypox virus production and spread by Interferon-β
    Sara C Johnston
    Virology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1425 Porter St, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
    Virol J 9:5. 2012
  5. pmc Formation of antiviral cytoplasmic granules during orthopoxvirus infection
    M Simpson-Holley
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA
    J Virol 85:1581-93. 2011
  6. pmc Akt inhibitor Akt-IV blocks virus replication through an Akt-independent mechanism
    Ewan F Dunn
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
    J Virol 83:11665-72. 2009
  7. pmc In vivo Ebola virus infection leads to a strong innate response in circulating immune cells
    Ignacio S Caballero
    Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA
    BMC Genomics 17:707. 2016
  8. doi request reprint Therapeutics Against Filovirus Infection
    John Connor
    Department of Microbiology, National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories, Boston University School of Medicine, 620 Albany Street, Boston, MA, 02118, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol . 2017
  9. pmc Transcriptional Profiling of the Immune Response to Marburg Virus Infection
    John H Connor
    Boston University School of Medicine Department of Microbiology and National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Virol 89:9865-74. 2015
  10. pmc Transcriptional profiling of the circulating immune response to lassa virus in an aerosol model of exposure
    Shikha Malhotra
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7:e2171. 2013

Collaborators

  • N Kedersha
  • Zackary W Whitlow
  • Ignacio S Caballero
  • Lisa E Hensley
  • Ewan F Dunn
  • Anna N Honko
  • Judy Y Yen
  • Shikha Malhotra
  • Ken Dower
  • Sara C Johnston
  • M Simpson-Holley
  • Marta Mele
  • Aaron E Lin
  • Chiara Gerhardinger
  • Sarah M Winnicki
  • Pardis C Sabeti
  • John L Rinn
  • Stephen K Gire
  • Arthur J Goff
  • Sara Garamszegi
  • Joshua C Johnson
  • John C Trefry
  • Eric M Mucker
  • Kenny L Lin
  • Erin N Hodges
  • Lauren E Brown
  • Zach B Bjornson
  • SCOTT SCHAUS
  • Kathleen H Rubins
  • Claire Marie Filone
  • Arthur Goff
  • Gordon Ruthel
  • K H Rubins
  • L E Hensley
  • P Anderson
  • K Dower
  • Rachel Fearns

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. pmc Vesicular stomatitis virus infection alters the eIF4F translation initiation complex and causes dephosphorylation of the eIF4E binding protein 4E-BP1
    John H Connor
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
    J Virol 76:10177-87. 2002
    ..This is the first noted modification of both eIF4E and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation levels among viruses that produce capped mRNA for protein translation...
  2. pmc New mRNAs are preferentially translated during vesicular stomatitis virus infection
    Zackary W Whitlow
    Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
    J Virol 82:2286-94. 2008
    ....
  3. pmc Lassa and Marburg viruses elicit distinct host transcriptional responses early after infection
    Ignacio S Caballero
    Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Boston University, 24 Cummington st, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    BMC Genomics 15:960. 2014
    ..Using the transcriptional response of the host during infection can lead to earlier diagnoses compared to those of traditional methods...
  4. pmc In vitro inhibition of monkeypox virus production and spread by Interferon-β
    Sara C Johnston
    Virology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1425 Porter St, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
    Virol J 9:5. 2012
    ....
  5. pmc Formation of antiviral cytoplasmic granules during orthopoxvirus infection
    M Simpson-Holley
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA
    J Virol 85:1581-93. 2011
    ..This is a novel finding that supports the hypothesis that the formation of subcellular protein aggregates is an important component of the successful cellular antiviral response...
  6. pmc Akt inhibitor Akt-IV blocks virus replication through an Akt-independent mechanism
    Ewan F Dunn
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
    J Virol 83:11665-72. 2009
    ..Identification of other targets for this compound may define a new approach for blocking virus replication...
  7. pmc In vivo Ebola virus infection leads to a strong innate response in circulating immune cells
    Ignacio S Caballero
    Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA
    BMC Genomics 17:707. 2016
    ..In this study, we analyze RNA sequencing data to determine the host response to Ebola virus infection in circulating immune cells...
  8. doi request reprint Therapeutics Against Filovirus Infection
    John Connor
    Department of Microbiology, National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories, Boston University School of Medicine, 620 Albany Street, Boston, MA, 02118, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol . 2017
    ..The ability to manage outbreaks with medical interventions beyond supportive care will require clinical trial design that will balance the benefits of the patient and scientific community...
  9. pmc Transcriptional Profiling of the Immune Response to Marburg Virus Infection
    John H Connor
    Boston University School of Medicine Department of Microbiology and National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Virol 89:9865-74. 2015
    ....
  10. pmc Transcriptional profiling of the circulating immune response to lassa virus in an aerosol model of exposure
    Shikha Malhotra
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7:e2171. 2013
    ....
  11. pmc Antiviral activity and RNA polymerase degradation following Hsp90 inhibition in a range of negative strand viruses
    John H Connor
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
    Virology 362:109-19. 2007
    ..Based on these results, we propose that Hsp90 is a host factor that is important for the replication of many negative strand viruses...
  12. pmc Identification of a pyridopyrimidinone inhibitor of orthopoxviruses from a diversity-oriented synthesis library
    Ken Dower
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Virol 86:2632-40. 2012
    ..These findings indicate that novel chemical synthesis approaches are a potential source for new infectious disease therapeutics and identify a potentially promising candidate for development to treat orthopoxvirus-infected individuals...
  13. pmc Dominant inhibition of Akt/protein kinase B signaling by the matrix protein of a negative-strand RNA virus
    Ewan F Dunn
    Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston MA 02118, USA
    J Virol 85:422-31. 2011
    ..It also suggests an inside-out model of signal transduction where VSV interruption of nuclear events has a rapid and significant effect on membrane signaling events...
  14. pmc Preferential translation of vesicular stomatitis virus mRNAs is conferred by transcription from the viral genome
    Zackary W Whitlow
    Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
    J Virol 80:11733-42. 2006
    ..This indicated that VSV mRNAs do contain cis-acting structural elements (that are not sequence based), which enhance translation efficiency of viral mRNAs...
  15. pmc Replication and cytopathic effect of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus in hypoxic tumor cells in vitro and in vivo
    John H Connor
    Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA
    J Virol 78:8960-70. 2004
    ..These results show for the first time that VSV has an inherent capacity for infecting and killing hypoxic cancer cells. This ability could represent a critical advantage over existing therapies in treating established tumors...
  16. pmc Role of residues 121 to 124 of vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein in virus assembly and virus-host interaction
    John H Connor
    Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA
    J Virol 80:3701-11. 2006
    ..These results demonstrate that the 121-to-124 region of the VSV M protein plays a minor role in virus assembly but is involved in virus-host interactions and VSV replication by augmenting viral-mRNA translation...
  17. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of host and viral translation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection. eIF2 is responsible for the inhibition of viral but not host translation
    John H Connor
    Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:13512-9. 2005
    ....