JEAN GREENBERG

Summary

Affiliation: University of Chicago
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc SGT1b is required for HopZ3-mediated suppression of the epiphytic growth of Pseudomonas syringae on N. benthamiana
    Jiyoung Lee
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology The University of Chicago Chicago, IL USA
    Plant Signal Behav 7:1129-31. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Positive and negative regulation of salicylic acid-dependent cell death and pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis lsd6 and ssi1 mutants
    J T Greenberg
    The University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 13:877-81. 2000
  3. ncbi request reprint The role and regulation of programmed cell death in plant-pathogen interactions
    Jean T Greenberg
    The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street, EBC410, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Cell Microbiol 6:201-11. 2004
  4. pmc Ceramides modulate programmed cell death in plants
    Hua Liang
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Genes Dev 17:2636-41. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Identifying type III effectors of plant pathogens and analyzing their interaction with plant cells
    Jean T Greenberg
    The University of Chicago, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, 1103 East 57th Street, Erman Biology Center, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 6:20-8. 2003
  6. pmc Uncoupling salicylic acid-dependent cell death and defense-related responses from disease resistance in the Arabidopsis mutant acd5
    J T Greenberg
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Genetics 156:341-50. 2000
  7. pmc A J domain virulence effector of Pseudomonas syringae remodels host chloroplasts and suppresses defenses
    Joanna Jelenska
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Curr Biol 17:499-508. 2007
  8. pmc Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 modulates programmed cell death
    Nan Yao
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Plant Cell 18:397-411. 2006
  9. pmc Pseudomonas syringae hijacks plant stress chaperone machinery for virulence
    Joanna Jelenska
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:13177-82. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint A key role for the Arabidopsis WIN3 protein in disease resistance triggered by Pseudomonas syringae that secrete AvrRpt2
    Min Woo Lee
    Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology Department, The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 20:1192-200. 2007

Research Grants

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications25

  1. pmc SGT1b is required for HopZ3-mediated suppression of the epiphytic growth of Pseudomonas syringae on N. benthamiana
    Jiyoung Lee
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology The University of Chicago Chicago, IL USA
    Plant Signal Behav 7:1129-31. 2012
    ..SGT1b is required for HopZ3- and AvrB3-induced cell death in N. benthamiana plants that express the Pto resistance gene from tomato. We suggest that HopZ3 activates R gene mediated responses in N. benthamiana...
  2. ncbi request reprint Positive and negative regulation of salicylic acid-dependent cell death and pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis lsd6 and ssi1 mutants
    J T Greenberg
    The University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 13:877-81. 2000
    ..I show that ssi1 is haploinsufficient, while lsd6 is a gain-of-function mutation. Thus, SA-dependent responses are under both negative and positive regulation...
  3. ncbi request reprint The role and regulation of programmed cell death in plant-pathogen interactions
    Jean T Greenberg
    The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street, EBC410, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Cell Microbiol 6:201-11. 2004
    ..We also review progress in discerning the mechanisms by which plant pcd occurs during these different interactions...
  4. pmc Ceramides modulate programmed cell death in plants
    Hua Liang
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Genes Dev 17:2636-41. 2003
    ..Strikingly, C2 ceramide induces, whereas its phosphorylated derivative partially blocks, plant PCD, supporting a role for ceramide phosphorylation in modulating cell death in plants...
  5. ncbi request reprint Identifying type III effectors of plant pathogens and analyzing their interaction with plant cells
    Jean T Greenberg
    The University of Chicago, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, 1103 East 57th Street, Erman Biology Center, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 6:20-8. 2003
    ..The type III secretome of P. syringae is highly variable and dynamic, a lesson gleaned from a comparative genomic analysis. Variation in the effector repertoire is likely to facilitate the adaptation of P. syringae to different hosts...
  6. pmc Uncoupling salicylic acid-dependent cell death and defense-related responses from disease resistance in the Arabidopsis mutant acd5
    J T Greenberg
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Genetics 156:341-50. 2000
    ..We propose that acd5 plants mimic P. syringae-infected wild-type plants and that both SA and ethylene are normally involved in regulating cell death during some susceptible pathogen infections...
  7. pmc A J domain virulence effector of Pseudomonas syringae remodels host chloroplasts and suppresses defenses
    Joanna Jelenska
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Curr Biol 17:499-508. 2007
    ..The P. syringae-specific HopI1 effector has a putative chloroplast-targeting sequence and a J domain. J domains function by activating 70 kDa heat-shock proteins (Hsp70)...
  8. pmc Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 modulates programmed cell death
    Nan Yao
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Plant Cell 18:397-411. 2006
    ....
  9. pmc Pseudomonas syringae hijacks plant stress chaperone machinery for virulence
    Joanna Jelenska
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:13177-82. 2010
    ..Enhanced susceptibility of Hsp70-depleted plants to nonpathogenic strains of P. syringae supports a defense-promoting role for Hsp70...
  10. ncbi request reprint A key role for the Arabidopsis WIN3 protein in disease resistance triggered by Pseudomonas syringae that secrete AvrRpt2
    Min Woo Lee
    Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology Department, The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 20:1192-200. 2007
    ..syringae carrying avrRpm1. Thus, WIN3 is a key element of the RPS2 defense response pathway and a basal and systemic defense component...
  11. doi request reprint Arabidopsis proteins important for modulating defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae that secrete HopW1-1
    Min Woo Lee
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street EBC410, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Plant J 54:452-65. 2008
    ..Thus, the WIN proteins have different roles in modulating plant defense...
  12. ncbi request reprint Bioinformatics correctly identifies many type III secretion substrates in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the biocontrol isolate P. fluorescens SBW25
    Boris A Vinatzer
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street, EBC410, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 18:877-88. 2005
    ..Finally, using the reduced AvrRpt2(101-255) reporter, we confirmed seven predicted effectors from P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, four from P. syringae pv. syringae B728a, and two from P. fluorescens SBW25...
  13. pmc Divergent roles in Arabidopsis thaliana development and defense of two homologous genes, aberrant growth and death2 and AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN1, encoding novel aminotransferases
    Jong Tae Song
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637
    Plant Cell 16:353-66. 2004
    ..We suggest that AGD2 synthesizes an important amino acid-derived molecule that promotes development and suppresses defenses, whereas ALD1 generates a related amino acid-derived molecule important for activating defense signaling...
  14. doi request reprint Priming in systemic plant immunity
    Ho Won Jung
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street EBC410, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Science 324:89-91. 2009
    ..Furthermore, the predicted secreted protein AZI1 is also important for generating vascular sap that confers disease resistance. Thus, azelaic acid and AZI1 are components of plant systemic immunity involved in priming defenses...
  15. ncbi request reprint A key role for ALD1 in activation of local and systemic defenses in Arabidopsis
    Jong Tae Song
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, Erman Biology Center, The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Plant J 40:200-12. 2004
    ..Finally, ALD1 and PAD4 can mutually affect each other's expression in a constitutive defense mutant, suggesting that these two genes can act in a signal amplification loop...
  16. ncbi request reprint Structure-function analysis of the plasma membrane- localized Arabidopsis defense component ACD6
    Hua Lu
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Plant J 44:798-809. 2005
    ..A plausible scenario is that information exchange between the ankyrin and transmembrane domains is involved in activating defense signaling...
  17. ncbi request reprint Degrade or die: a dual function for autophagy in the plant immune response
    Jean T Greenberg
    The Department of Developmental Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Dev Cell 8:799-801. 2005
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint The mitochondrion--an organelle commonly involved in programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana
    Nan Yao
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, 1103 East 57th Street EBC410, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Plant J 40:596-610. 2004
    ..However, unlike in animal cells, in plant cells, mitochondrial cytochrome c release is not an obligatory step in PCD control...
  19. pmc Evolutionary dynamics of Ralstonia solanacearum
    Jose A Castillo
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:1225-38. 2007
    ..Finally, genes essential for species survival are under purifying selection, and those directly involved in pathogenesis might be under diversifying selection...
  20. pmc ACD6, a novel ankyrin protein, is a regulator and an effector of salicylic acid signaling in the Arabidopsis defense response
    Hua Lu
    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    Plant Cell 15:2408-20. 2003
    ..syringae, and BTH-inducible and/or a low level of spontaneous cell death. Thus, ACD6 is a necessary and dose-dependent activator of the defense response against virulent bacteria and can activate SA-dependent cell death...
  21. ncbi request reprint Whole-genome analysis to identify type III-secreted effectors
    Boris A Vinatzer
    Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 354:19-34. 2007
    ..It should be possible to apply this method to most Gram-negative plant pathogens. The second method consists of a bioinformatic approach applicable to those pathogens for which at least a draft genome sequence is available...
  22. ncbi request reprint The type III effector repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and its role in survival and disease on host and non-host plants
    Boris A Vinatzer
    Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Fralin Biotechnology Center, West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 0346, USA
    Mol Microbiol 62:26-44. 2006
    ..We conclude that P. syringae strains may have evolved large effector repertoires to extend their host ranges or increase their survival on various unrelated plant species...
  23. ncbi request reprint A functional screen for the type III (Hrp) secretome of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae
    David S Guttman
    Department of Botany, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada
    Science 295:1722-6. 2002
    ..The secretion of two of these putative effectors was shown to be type III--dependent. Effectors showed high interstrain variation, supporting a role for some effectors in adaptation to different hosts...
  24. ncbi request reprint Identification of open reading frames unique to a select agent: Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2
    Dean W Gabriel
    Plant Pathology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 19:69-79. 2006
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Proposed guidelines for a unified nomenclature and phylogenetic analysis of type III Hop effector proteins in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae
    Magdalen Lindeberg
    Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Mol Plant Microbe Interact 18:275-82. 2005
    ..Phylogenetic analyses of previously characterized Hops are described, the results of which have been used to guide their integration into the proposed nomenclature...

Research Grants1

  1. Molecular Basis of Pathogen-Induced Cell Death in Plants
    JEAN GREENBERG; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Because experimental progress using a plant model is rapid, the results obtained and quickly be related to human biology and disease. ..