MEMBRANE FUSION ATPASES AND THE GOLGI APPARATUS

Summary

Principal Investigator: GRAHAM B WARREN
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Using a cell-free system than mimics the mitotic cycle of the Golgi apparatus, we have been able to identify many of the proteins involved in the fragmentation and reassembly of this organelle. The last granting period focused on the reassembly of Golgi cisternae that is catalyzed by two ATPases, NSF and p97. NSF was shown to have an activity additional to its well-characterized role in unraveling SNARE complexes. It was found to add the ubiquitin-like protein, GATE-16, to the v-SNARE, GOS-28, a process that prevented the formation of non-productive cis SNARE complexes, and primed the SNARE for its interaction with the cognate t-SNARE, syntaxin-5. The p97 ATPase utilizes p47 as an adaptor molecule and this was shown to recognize mono-ubiquitinated proteins as part of the Golgi reassembly process. Other adaptor molecules were identified and characterized, notably the Ufd1p/Np14 complex, and this was shown to mediate p97 action in processes ranging from ER-associated degradation through to nuclear envelope reassembly. The present proposal continues the analysis of these two ATPase-driven pathways focusing on the following aims: 1: Studying the p115 tethering protein to work out precisely how it choreographs the capture and docking of cis-directed COPI transport vesicles. 2: Characterizing a new tethering complex that likely mediates the capture and docking of other COPI vesicles to medial/trans cistemae. The composition and function of these vesicles will also be characterized as will others identified and isolated through capture by different tethers. 3: Determining the role played by ubiquitin in the p97 pathway of Golgi reassembly. Ubiquitinated targets will be identified and characterized. 4: Testing the idea that p97 unravels t-t SNARE complexes just as NSF unravels v-t SNARE complexes. The fusion of ER membranes in budding yeast will be used as the assay. Though the main thrust of this application is the study of fundamental membrane traffic processes, there are medical implications. The tethering proteins were first identified as auto-antigens in patients with Sjogren's syndrome, and in one case as a partner for OCRL1, a PIP2 phosphatase, implicated in oculocerebrorenal syndrome. Ufd1p is mutated in DiGeorge syndrome, a congenital developmental disorder, and the role played by p97 in unraveling protein aggregates has implicated this ATPase in neurodegenerative diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to Huntington disease. Insights into the molecular mechanism of Golgi reassembly may therefore provide insight into these medical conditions.
Funding Period: 2000-03-01 - 2008-09-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc The golgin tether giantin regulates the secretory pathway by controlling stack organization within Golgi apparatus
    Mayuko Koreishi
    The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan
    PLoS ONE 8:e59821. 2013
  2. pmc In situ cleavage of the acidic domain from the p115 tether inhibits exocytic transport
    Ayano Satoh
    Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520 8002, USA
    Traffic 9:1522-9. 2008
  3. pmc Ankyrin repeat proteins comprise a diverse family of bacterial type IV effectors
    Xiaoxiao Pan
    Section of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, 295 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT 06536, USA
    Science 320:1651-4. 2008
  4. pmc Following the fate in vivo of COPI vesicles generated in vitro
    Christoph Rutz
    Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, Heidelberg, Germany
    Traffic 10:994-1005. 2009
  5. pmc mTrs130 is a component of a mammalian TRAPPII complex, a Rab1 GEF that binds to COPI-coated vesicles
    Akinori Yamasaki
    Department of Cell Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 20:4205-15. 2009

Detail Information

Publications5

  1. pmc The golgin tether giantin regulates the secretory pathway by controlling stack organization within Golgi apparatus
    Mayuko Koreishi
    The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan
    PLoS ONE 8:e59821. 2013
    ..These results suggest that the spatial organization of the Golgi ribbon is mediated by giantin, which also plays a role in cargo transport and sugar modifications...
  2. pmc In situ cleavage of the acidic domain from the p115 tether inhibits exocytic transport
    Ayano Satoh
    Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520 8002, USA
    Traffic 9:1522-9. 2008
    ..The results show that cleavage inhibits exocytic transport to the cell surface...
  3. pmc Ankyrin repeat proteins comprise a diverse family of bacterial type IV effectors
    Xiaoxiao Pan
    Section of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, 295 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT 06536, USA
    Science 320:1651-4. 2008
    ..pneumophila-containing vacuole with late endosomes after infection of macrophages, which demonstrates that Ank proteins have effector functions important for bacterial infection of eukaryotic host cells...
  4. pmc Following the fate in vivo of COPI vesicles generated in vitro
    Christoph Rutz
    Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, Heidelberg, Germany
    Traffic 10:994-1005. 2009
    ..The COPI vesicle-derived labeled membrane proteins could be classified into two types that behaved like endogenous proteins after Brefeldin A treatment...
  5. pmc mTrs130 is a component of a mammalian TRAPPII complex, a Rab1 GEF that binds to COPI-coated vesicles
    Akinori Yamasaki
    Department of Cell Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 20:4205-15. 2009
    ..We propose that mTRAPPII is a Rab1 GEF that tethers COPI-coated vesicles to early Golgi membranes...