Core symptoms and profiles in premenstrual syndrome

Summary

Principal Investigator: Ellen Freeman
Abstract: [unreadable] DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This is a competing continuation of our studies of premenstrual syndromes (PMS). PMS is a complex and chronic disorder that involves mood, behavioral and physical symptoms that are linked to women's menstrual cycles and disrupt functioning for several days to 2 weeks each month. The specific aims of this application are to utilize existing data from women who sought treatment for PMS in our NIH studies to determine the following: 1) Identify a subset of 5-7 core symptoms of clinically significant PMS and their associations with functional impairment; 2) Identify symptom profiles (clusters) in women with severe PMS. 3) Test whether the profiles differentially respond to serotonergic antidepressant treatment; compare the improvement associated with symptom profiles with improvement associated with core symptoms to determine whether symptom profiles are more clinically meaningful than core symptoms identified in Aim 1. 4) Compare PMS symptoms and symptom profiles between African American and Caucasian women. Although approximately 20% of menstruating women suffer from PMS to a degree that is severely distressing and disrupts daily functioning, there are no demonstrated and widely accepted criteria for a diagnosis of PMS. While the utility of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is demonstrated for research purposes, its restrictive criteria fail to include the majority of cases in the clinical setting. The absence of a widely-accepted diagnosis for PMS has significant economic costs that result from poor diagnosis and inadequate treatment as evidenced in the increased costs of health care services for these women. There are also high personal costs as indicated by the burden of disease over their reproductive lifetimes. Identifying core symptoms of PMS and the symptoms that significantly contribute to the impairment of PMS can contribute to a more evidence-based and widely-accepted diagnosis of this disorder. Identifying symptoms and/or symptom profiles that respond to SSRI treatment can improve the use of this treatment for symptoms that are more likely to respond. Whether there are racial differences in PMS symptoms is not known but is important for health care. Information from this study can also reduce the heterogeneity of symptoms in women selected for research studies, resulting in more consistent findings across studies and increasing the potential for identifying underlying mechanisms of the disorder. Results of the study are particularly important for primary care where evaluations of a plethora of symptoms are seldom conducted or feasible, and there is no systematic approach to identifying cases. Further information will contribute to improved health care for women in their reproductive years. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]
Funding Period: 2007-09-01 - 2010-08-31
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Time to relapse after short- or long-term treatment of severe premenstrual syndrome with sertraline
    Ellen W Freeman
    Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 5509, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 66:537-44. 2009
  2. pmc Core symptoms that discriminate premenstrual syndrome
    Ellen W Freeman
    Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    J Womens Health (Larchmt) 20:29-35. 2011
  3. pmc Clinical subtypes of premenstrual syndrome and responses to sertraline treatment
    Ellen W Freeman
    Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Obstet Gynecol 118:1293-300. 2011

Detail Information

Publications4

  1. pmc Time to relapse after short- or long-term treatment of severe premenstrual syndrome with sertraline
    Ellen W Freeman
    Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 5509, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 66:537-44. 2009
    ..The duration of treatment after achieving a satisfactory response is unknown in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome. This information is needed in view of the improvement provided by medication vs the adverse effects and costs of drugs...
  2. pmc Core symptoms that discriminate premenstrual syndrome
    Ellen W Freeman
    Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    J Womens Health (Larchmt) 20:29-35. 2011
    ..To identify core symptoms that discriminate premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in prospective daily diary ratings and determine the association of these symptoms with functional impairment...
  3. pmc Clinical subtypes of premenstrual syndrome and responses to sertraline treatment
    Ellen W Freeman
    Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Obstet Gynecol 118:1293-300. 2011
    ..To estimate response of diagnosis and symptom-based subtypes to sertraline treatment...