Environmental Changes and Health Outcomes across 25 Years: Four US Cities

Summary

Principal Investigator: Penny Gordon-Larsen
Abstract: ABSTRACT While observational research suggests an association between obesity-related social environment factors with obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors, very little research has addressed the specific factors and pathways linking the social environment to cardiometabolic risk. The primary reasons for this lack of research are: 1) lack of high quality data on diet, activity, measured height and weight over time linked to cardiometabolic risk biomarkers;2) lack of fine-grain longitudinal data on the introduction, renovation, and closure of food- and activity-related environmental features;and 3) lack of complex statistical models examining each piece of the time-dependent, complex system, accounting for the process by which food, activity, and transportation facilities are established and expanded and the potential for individuals to selectively migrate to locate near such facilities. The 25-year, longitudinal Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study provides a wide age range, high quality longitudinal, biological, behavioral and anthropometry and biomarker data of CARDIA, geographic diversity, and different patterns and pace of change across the four baseline cities: Birmingham, Chicago, Minneapolis and Oakland. The research team has developed a unique method to use retrospective and contemporary sources to create data on the timing and placement of introductions, renovations, and closures of: 1) food resources (e.g., restaurants, food shopping);2) recreation facilities (e.g., trails, parks);and 3) transportation infrastructure (e.g., light rail, bike parking, bike paths) in Birmingham, Chicago, Minneapolis, and Oakland over a 25-year period. Furthermore, we have developed sophisticated statistical models that account for purposeful (as opposed to random) placement of relevant resources in the social environment as well as individuals'ability to selectively migrate to locate near such resources. Study objectives include: 1) Develop and validate new fine-grain measures to capture introductions, renovations, and closures representing changes in: a) parks, trails, and other recreational sites;b) food environments;and c) transportation infrastructure that will be contemporaneously linked to CARDIA respondents'geographic locations over 25 years;and 2) Using this unique data source, estimate the effects of introductions, renovations, and closures of key food and activity facilities and transportation infrastructure on diet and activity behaviors, body weight and cardiometabolic risk in the four field cities over 25 years, while accounting for the endogenous placement of food and activity facilities and selective migration. We will specifically focus on comparisons across individual-level race, income, and education groups to examine how environmental factors contribute to race and SES inequalities in diet, obesity, and cardiometabolic risk from young- to mid-adulthood. The proposed research will improve current understanding of the mechanisms through which social environments (specifically broader societal, economic, and environmental contexts) influence health outcomes.
Funding Period: 2011-09-30 - 2015-06-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Neighborhood socioeconomic status predictors of physical activity through young to middle adulthood: the CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Soc Sci Med 72:641-9. 2011
  2. pmc Fast food restaurants and food stores: longitudinal associations with diet in young to middle-aged adults: the CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Arch Intern Med 171:1162-70. 2011
  3. pmc Dietary patterns matter: diet beverages and cardiometabolic risks in the longitudinal Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings Global School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 95:909-15. 2012
  4. pmc The neighborhood energy balance equation: does neighborhood food retail environment + physical activity environment = obesity? The CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e85141. 2013

Detail Information

Publications5

  1. pmc Neighborhood socioeconomic status predictors of physical activity through young to middle adulthood: the CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Soc Sci Med 72:641-9. 2011
    ....
  2. pmc Fast food restaurants and food stores: longitudinal associations with diet in young to middle-aged adults: the CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Arch Intern Med 171:1162-70. 2011
    ....
  3. pmc Dietary patterns matter: diet beverages and cardiometabolic risks in the longitudinal Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings Global School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 95:909-15. 2012
    ..Although diet beverages are typically consumed to promote weight control, positive associations with increased cardiometabolic risk have been reported...
  4. pmc The neighborhood energy balance equation: does neighborhood food retail environment + physical activity environment = obesity? The CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e85141. 2013
    ..We estimated joint, interactive, and cumulative impacts of neighborhood food retail and PA environment characteristics on body mass index (BMI) throughout early adulthood...

Research Grants30

  1. Obesity and Metabolic Risk Disparities: Underlying Food Environment Factors
    Penny Gordon-Larsen; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Our overall impact is to identify economic and food environment factors that are associated with health and can be addressed as potential targets for intervention to reduce disparities in obesity and metabolic risk. ..
  2. Boston Puerto Rican Health Study - CVD Risk Factors
    Katherine L Tucker; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..abstract_text> ..
  3. Environmental and Acceptance-Based Innovations for Weight Loss Maintenance
    Meghan Butryn; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Secondary aims will compare weight loss in BT+EA vs. BT+E, and BT+E vs. BT, and examine dietary intake and physical activity as outcomes. Exploratory aims will examine mediation and moderation of treatment outcome. ..
  4. Television Advertising and Children's Diet Activity and Obesity Prevalence
    Lisa Powell; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ....
  5. Impact of Food Marketing and Cross-Promotions on Preschoolers'Dietary Intake
    Meghan R Longacre; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Findings from this study will have important public health implications for preventing obesity in children. ..
  6. Neighborhood Environments and Diet: Evaluating the Fast Food Ban in Los Angeles
    Roland Sturm; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..g., media attention to local diets). ..
  7. Emergence of Cardiometabolic Risk Across the Lifecycle in China
    Penny Gordon-Larsen; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ....
  8. COBRE Center for Central Nervous System Function
    Jerome N Sanes; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..The COBRE Center will leverage the administrative resources available through the Brown Institute for Brain Science to ensure efficient operation and coordinate with other brain science research activities at Brown. ..
  9. Impact of Environmental Changes on Children's BMI and Behaviors: A Panel Study
    MICHAEL JOEL YEDIDIA; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ....
  10. NEW MODALITIES FOR TREATMENT OF PAIN AND DRUG ABUSE
    Victor J Hruby; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ....
  11. Hopkins Center for Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities
    Lisa A Cooper; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..abstract_text> ..
  12. Rush Center for Urban Health Equity
    Lynda H Powell; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Funding is now sought to bring these resources together to establish a unique center of excellence in health disparities interventions. ..
  13. Notch-Mediated Expansion of Cord Blood Progenitors for Stem Cell Transplant
    Colleen Delaney; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Our goal is to now determine the clinical efficacy of this approach in a phase II clinical trial. ..
  14. Center of Excellence for Health Disparties in the Nation's Capital
    PHYLLIS R MAGRAB; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..The important cross-cutting objectives of Cultural Competence intersect with each of these areas. ..
  15. Causes and Interventions for Childhood Obesity:Innovative Systems Analysis
    Youfa Wang; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..We will also project the impacts of several childhood obesity intervention strategies. ..