NEUROTRANSMITTER CONTROL OF IONIC CHANNELS

Summary

Principal Investigator: BRUCE BEAN
Abstract: Voltage-dependent calcium channels are present in all nerve and muscle cells. In heart muscle, calcium entry through voltage- dependent calcium channels triggers contraction. In neurons, calcium entry through presynaptic calcium channels plays multiple roles, including triggering release of neurotransmitter. Calcium channels in cardiac muscle and neurons can be modulated by the action of neurotransmitters and hormones. The proposed work will investigate mechanisms by which neurotransmitters modulate voltage- dependent calcium channels in cardiac myocytes and in hippocampal neurons. Patch clamp techniques will be used to study the control of calcium channels in cardiac myocytes by beta-adrenergic stimulation, using coordinated measurements of whole cell current, gating current, and single channel current. Cloned calcium channels in heterologous expression systems will be used to explore in detail how voltage-dependent gating steps are controlled by phosphorylation of the channel. The control of calcium channels by beta-adrenergic stimulation will be also studied in hippocampal CA3 and granule neurons. The types of calcium channels subject to beta- adrenergic modulation will be identified using selective toxins. The alteration of voltage-dependent gating properties of the channels will be characterized, and the consequences for control of the firing properties of the neurons will be explored. Using cardiac muscle, hippocampal neurons, and cloned channels, the mechanisms underlying potentiated channel activity induced by strong depolarizations will be studied. The physiological significance of this potentiation during action potentials in cardiac muscle and neurons will be evaluated. Neurotransmitter control of calcium channels is a basic process for the normal operation of the heart and the brain. Understanding the mechanisms involved will help understand pathological states such as cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac failure, stroke, and epilepsy.
Funding Period: 1985-04-01 - 2004-07-31
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc FPL 64176 modification of Ca(V)1.2 L-type calcium channels: dissociation of effects on ionic current and gating current
    Stefan I McDonough
    Department of Neuroscience, Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, California, USA
    Biophys J 88:211-23. 2005

Detail Information

Publications1

  1. pmc FPL 64176 modification of Ca(V)1.2 L-type calcium channels: dissociation of effects on ionic current and gating current
    Stefan I McDonough
    Department of Neuroscience, Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, California, USA
    Biophys J 88:211-23. 2005
    ..Instead, FPL somehow affects the coupling of charge movement to opening and closing of the pore. An intriguing possibility is that the drug causes an inactivated state to become conducting without otherwise affecting gating transitions...